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Tag Archives: beads

lilliana glenn’s flameworked beads

Lilliana Glenn works out of a home studio in Massachusetts creating flameworked glass beads, vessels and jewelry. Glenn says that she feels like a choreographer when she works with glass and she likes that the material has some control over the dance: “The glass surprises me sometimes in ways that influence my thinking and make me a better artist – an artist who speaks the language of the glass but never speaks for the glass.”

A River Runs Through

Russian Scarf Vessel

White Berry Seed Necklace

Glaciers


Constellation Vessel

Reef Jewel Necklace

Stairs To Heaven

Lilliana Glenn on the web:
Etsy
Crafthaus
Website

susan etcoff fraerman: narrative shoes

I have a small collection of vintage shoe forms – they are part of a larger collection of objects that provoke my curious nature and provide silent companionship in my studio.  I started collecting the shoe lasts more than a year ago and continue to be charmed by the character of the wood, the variety of shapes, stretching mechanisms and range of sizes.

 

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Bound For Glory III, glass beads, semi precious stones, found object

Susan Etcoff Fraerman used several vintage shoe forms in her beaded Narrative Shoes series, 14 different shoes that each tell a story, ranging from well-worn toe shoes to Chinese slippers.  They are all lovely, but the shoe forms are what pulled me in.

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Bound For Glory III, detail

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The Blues

Fraerman works intuitively and you won’t find looms, patterns or graphs in her studio. She explains that, “the beads, varying in texture, size, degree of translucency and hue, are woven in a free form interpretation of a classic stitch – right angle weave.”

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Lotus Shoes

My work often speaks of contemporary issues that have touched me deeply: children in need, mutability of the body, the vicissitudes of life. Susan Etcoff Fraerman

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Bound For Glory I, glass & metal beads, nylon thread, found object

Shoes are not the only objects that Fraerman transforms with her intricate, tactile beadwork. Be sure to check out Bra Books, “intimate repositories of dreams, thoughts and poetry” and her latest work, The Language of Hands, where the hand in closed fist, open palm and other gestures is used to express a metaphor of universal signals.

More about Susan Etcoff Fraerman at WomanMade.

I’m headed down to NYC to spend time with my daughter.  I think the weekend calls for sensible shoes – no heels or beads for me.  Have a cozy, comfy, art-filled weekend!

brad pearson on the importance of form

Read glass artist Brad Pearson’s blog entry about the importance of form. Pearson maintains that form is the most important factor to consider when making beads.

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Kent Ipsen, an early pioneer of the studio glass movement, was one of Pearson’s professors twenty years ago. He tells this story about an Ipsen critique – the one that taught him about the importance of form:

“We were all told to bring in our best piece (a glassblowing piece). All of us trotted in with the best designs, dichroic glass, and glass bling that we could muster. My professor (Kent Ipsen) then proceeded to paint all of the work flat black. His next words have stayed with me for twenty years. “Now is it still your favorite piece?” When the work was all painted in a dull flat black, we sat down and got all nitty gritty on the form. That is one day I think we all learned a lot.”

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Ipsen had an interesting way of getting right to the point and it certainly made an impression. I think you can substitute any medium, any object and ask yourself the same question: Are you focusing enough on form or does the latest technique, material or trend distract you?  Something to think about this morning.

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I was happy to see that the only black on the glass marbles above was put there deliberately by Pearson. Hot stuff.

Pearson’s blog

Pearson’s website
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