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Category Archives: Glass

jason gamrath revisited

I first posted about Jason Gamrath in 2012, as he was beginning to burst onto the glass art scene. I wasn’t kidding when I said he was one to watch. His recent Venus Fly Trap and Pitcher Plant collection is luscious.

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gamrath_pitcherplants_red

 

gamrath_venus_flytrap

At first glance you notice that Gamrath’s sculptures of flowers and plants are lovely. Sure. But wait. WAIT. In most of the images you don’t get a good sense of the size of the sculptures – and it’s the size that sets these beauties apart. The Columbine sculptures pictured below? 8 feet tall. Oh.My.Goodness.

gamrath_aquilegia_blue

 

gamrath_columbine_details

 

gamrath_columbine

 

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You cannot fully appreciate this work until you see the creations installed.

gamrath_with_carnivorous

The artist and his Venus Fly Trap

 

Jason Gamrath’s website¬†

Previous post on DAM about Gamrath

nick mount: seduction by still life

Nick Mount’s ongoing series of plumb bobs, scent bottles, fruits and cans are a seductive collection of objects expertly combined in still life settings that draw the viewer in. The glass forms beg to be caressed, if not by the hand, then certainly by the eye. Stunning.

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mount7

 

mount12

 

mount1

 

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mount13

 

mount15

 

mount16

One of the pre-eminent artists in the Australian studio glass movement, Nick Mount has been a glass blower for more than four decades. In 2012 he was given the distinction of Living Treasure by the Australian Center for Craft and Design. It’s easy to see why.

Nick Mount’s website

paul messink: ghostly glass panels

Viewers often ask glass artist Paul Messink if he embeds photographs in his work. No. Not even close.

messink_north_avenue_beach_chicago

North Avenue Beach, Chicago, 9 layers

While the work looks like it might include photographs, the Illinois artist actually paints images onto several layers of glass. He applies enamel by hand, creating depth by layering, diminishing size and color, texture and translucence in each of the 9-12 layers needed to complete one panel. The layers are then kiln-cast to form one solid layer.

messink_misty_road

Misty Road, 9 layers

messink_solitude

Solitude, 6 layers

messink_light_rain

Light Rain, 9 layers

“Looking at nature for inspiration, I create scenes which often include bare trees. I like bare trees because of their minimalism, and because they reveal a great deal of character.”

messink_forest_fog

Forest in Fog, 9 layers

The trees enveloped in fog give me a quiet place to rest my eyes; my mind slows a bit; my heart finds a moment of much needed peace. Many thanks to Paul for a peaceful start to my day. . .

Paul Messink’s website

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