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Author Archives: Susan Lomuto

always keep something broken about you. . .

“Now there is one thing I can tell you: you will enjoy certain pleasures you would not fathom now. When you still had your mother you often thought of the days when you would have her no longer. Now you will often think of days past when you had her. When you are used to this horrible thing that they will forever be cast into the past, then you will gently feel her revive, returning to take her place, her entire place, beside you. At the present time, this is not yet possible. Let yourself be inert, wait till the incomprehensible power. . .that has broken you restores you a little, I say a little, for henceforth you will always keep something broken about you. Tell yourself this, too, for it is a kind of pleasure to know that you will never love less, that you will never be consoled, that you will constantly remember more and more.”  ~ Marcel Proust

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I’ve been away from the blog for a long time, taking care of my mother. Earlier this month she died peacefully, surrounded by love. Perfectly imperfect and deeply loved, she is already fiercely missed. I am grateful I was able to be completely present to her, honored to be a guide as she completed her final journey on this earth. Cathartic, poignant and bittersweet for both of us.

My mother read DAM faithfully. Over the last several months she often asked when I was going to post on DAM again. Every now and then I found the time for a post and it was sweet to watch her face light up when she really liked the art. . .I will miss that. . .and so much more.

I was working on the September issue of MAM when she died. . .then couldn’t bring myself to finish it. Somehow finishing it made this more real. Irrational? Yes. But that’s how I felt. I’m back home now, working on finding a new normal, finally finishing up the September issue of MAM, getting ready to begin work on the October issue and thinking about new posts for DAM.

Thank you for standing by patiently until I returned. Heartfelt apologies to MAM subscribers for the long delay this month. The September issue will be in your inboxes soon. I can hear my mom say “What are you waiting for?”  Don’t worry mom – I’m on it.

There will always be something broken about me now and that’s ok – it is a reminder that I will never love less, that I will never be consoled, that I will constantly remember more and more. 

sipho mabona: there’s an elephant in the room

Professional Origami artist Sipho Mabona set out to show the world that there are no limits to what you can make with a square of paper.

WHITE ELEPHANT

His goal was to make a life-size replica of one of the largest mammals on earth – the elephant. In late 2013 he launched a successful indiegogo crowdfunding project to create The White Elephant.

WHITE ELEPHANT

Folded by Mabona and three assistants, a metal structure supports the folded paper sculpture to ensure that the origami mammal can stand.

mabona_wip1

The elephant in progress.

SIPHO MABONA

 Sipho Mabona holds a scaled down version of the white elephant

mabona_elephant

One of the perks for the funders was a ceramic cast of the creased paper. The folds are the exact folds used to create the elephant. LOVE this concept!

Sipho Mabona’s website

If you enjoyed Mabona’s White Elephant, don’t miss the videos of his Toshiba origami ad campaigns. Nicely done.

 

jason schneider’s corrugated cardboard and plaster sculpture

Jason Schneider is a furniture designer. The fact that he uses cardboard almost exclusively to make furniture sets him apart from most furniture designers.

schneider_exquisite_cardboard

Exquisite Cardboard, corrugated cardboard, plaster, 12″ x 5″

Add to that his collection of corrugated cardboard and plaster sculptures and, well, you’ve got an artist who makes my heart pound.

schneider_plaster_push

Plaster Push, corrugated cardboard, plaster, 5″ x 10″ diameter
Currently, Schneider is the furniture design and woodworking studio coordinator at The Anderson Ranch Art Center in Colorado. He continues to transfer many skills learned as a woodworker to develop innovative techniques using cardboard.

schneider_dumbbell_study

Dumbbell Study, corrugated cardboard,  plaster, 22″ x 6″

Although his sculpture is showcased here, please don’t take that to mean that his furniture isn’t worthy. It is. Check out the link below for the furniture portfolio to see what I mean.

schneider_wobble_tops

Wobble Tops, corrugated cardboard, poplar, milk paint, 5″ x 4″ diameter

schneider_spinning_wheel

Spinning Wheel, corrugated cardboard, plaster, 10″ x 22″

“My exploration into the use and function of this low-status and commonly overlooked material is what drives me.” ~Jason Schneider

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